Majority of Americans Say No Carbon Tax

Posted by Lisa Camooso Miller at 2:41 pm, December 10, 2012

As Congress and the President work to address our nation’s economic challenges, some have suggested a carbon tax as a new revenue source for the government.  But the cost of a carbon tax would fall largely on middle- and lower-income Americans who would be forced to pay higher prices for staples like electricity and gasoline.  This doesn’t seem right.  Perhaps that’s why when Americans are told about the costs of a carbon tax, 66 percent say they oppose it; compared to just 18 percent who support it.

With so much economic uncertainty, additional taxes are the last thing that Americans need. That’s why it makes sense that according to a recent poll, more than 41 percent of Americans are opposed to a carbon tax. More than a quarter (27 percent) of the respondents were “unsure,” signaling that many Americans are not engaged on the issue – highlighting how out of the mainstream such an idea is.

Americans rely on affordable, stable electricity prices—something that coal provides. Additional fees and expenses on our electricity threaten our economy and hamper our country’s ability to recover.

This proposed tax could cause electricity rates to increase across the country, as well as cause job losses. According to the same poll, 77 percent of respondents said that US policies in the next four years should include clean coal electricity.

Americans can’t afford further job losses and increased electricity prices. It’s time to use our abundant, domestic resources to keep our country on track.

 


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