Rising Energy Costs are Straining Families’ Budgets

Posted by Laura Sheehan at 2:41 pm, March 18, 2014

A recent report concluded what many American families already understand all too well – energy costs in the U.S. are on the rise. Since 2011, real energy costs for middle- and low-income families have increased by an astounding 27 percent. These costs are rising quickly, while real incomes have declined.

We rolled out a new hub on our website last week that features interesting facts that puts rising energy costs into terms to which we can all relate.

For example, the average American family will spend $479.33 per month on energy costs in 2014. That’s enough to buy 61 rotisserie chickens or 121 gallons of milk. Aside from necessities like food and housing, this year’s average energy cost total is enough to cover the cost of a kitchen remodel, or tablets for an entire elementary school class.

These figures highlight how energy is competing with other basic needs like housing, food and healthcare within families’ budgets. Sadly, as energy costs are projected to increase, families will see little relief in the near future.

The problem of high energy costs will only be exacerbated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as it sets overreaching carbon emissions regulations for power plants. EPA’s New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for coal-fueled power plants promises to increase energy costs by placing a de facto ban on the construction of any new coal plants. By eliminating an affordable resource that offers reliable, baseload power to the electricity grid and that supports thousands of jobs across the country, EPA is setting our communities up for higher energy prices with no relief in sight.

By limiting our nation’s energy costs through the use of a diverse, affordable energy mix, we can lighten the burden on our hard-working families.

Check out the new site to learn more and see how you can take action to protect affordable power derived from coal.

 


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