EPA is Visiting Georgia, a Leader in Fuel Diversity

Posted by Laura Sheehan at 10:58 am, July 23, 2014

In a state known for sweet peaches, the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) newest carbon regulations for existing power plants will leave Georgia feeling the unfortunate effects of sour policy. With these carbon regulations, the EPA is imposing one of the strictest emissions rates on a state that should be used as an example of responsible energy policy.

Georgia has exemplified a diverse, all-of-the above energy portfolio by generating power from coal, natural gas, nuclear, hydropower and other renewables.  To provide reliable base load power, Georgia relies on coal for one-third of its electricity generation. The use of coal has helped the Peach State keep electricity rates affordable, allowing businesses to hire more Georgia residents and offer lower prices to consumers. If EPA’s overreaching carbon regulations go into effect, the security of Georgia’s energy and economic sectors will face tough times ahead.

Next week, EPA is offering Georgians the opportunity to weigh in on its proposed plan; a plan that will shape the future of power production in their state. EPA is visiting just three cities outside of Washington, D.C. to gather in-person feedback on these carbon regulations, and Georgia made it onto the list. There are many things EPA left out of its overreaching plan that I know they’ll hear about in Atlanta on Tuesday and Wednesday.

For starters, EPA has given no consideration to the consumer cost of these regulations. Even with the affordable electricity rates coal affords Georgia, many citizens still struggle to pay their utility bills. Nearly 1.8 million low and middle-income families – over half of the state’s population – already spend 24 percent of their after-tax income on their power bills. EPA’s carbon regulations will force Georgia to reduce its reliance on affordable and reliable coal, which will only heighten the struggles these families face. President Obama himself admitted during the 2008 presidential campaign that the power plan he envisioned would cause electricity rates to “necessarily skyrocket.” This is a cost vulnerable Georgia families should not, and frankly cannot, be forced to pay. By maintaining coal’s role as a vital element of their energy mix, these staggering costs can be avoided.

But families and households are not the only Georgians who depend on affordable electricity – businesses across the state need reliable, low-cost electricity to run their operations and balance their books. This spring, electricity prices for homes and businesses have been below the national average. As energy costs increase, businesses in Georgia will be forced to confront unreasonably high rates in lieu of growing and hiring workers. As if rising cost of living tied to energy costs wasn’t a burden enough, EPA’s regulations also have the potential to increase unemployment in the state. With the nation slowly gaining a sense of economic relief after the recent recession, it is astounding the Obama Administration is pushing policies that will wreak such economic havoc on the lives of Georgia families, as well as families across the country.

These negative consequences can be avoided through the continued use and development of abundant, affordable, and reliable coal. By maintaining its diverse energy portfolio, and playing an active role in setting the course for its future, Georgia can ensure that households and businesses have the affordable power needed for prosperity.

Just this year the state passed a resolution that asserts the importance of an “all-of-the-above” energy strategy for Georgia, dictated by state lawmakers as opposed to federal bureaucrats. A diverse portfolio not only promotes economic stability, but it also protects the energy security of the Peach State. Like millions across the U.S., Georgia citizens rely on affordable power to light their path towards a successful future. It is crucial that coal remains in Georgia’s energy mix so that this future, fueled by affordable electricity, becomes a reality.

If you want to weigh in on this important policy decision, visit www.KeepAmericasPowerOn.org today to file a comment with the EPA. Tell them these carbon regulations won’t work for Americans in Georgia and across the country.


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