Posts filed under Guest Posts

Kelley Earnhardt Miller on Clean Coal Technology

Throughout my partnership with America’s Power, I’ve had the opportunity to learn about the important role coal plays in producing affordable, reliable electricity. One of the most fascinating topics I’ve encountered along the way is clean coal technology, which refers to a number of advanced tools and controls that help coal-fired power plants generate electricity more cleanly and efficiently than ever before.

Growing up around racing, I’ve witnessed how the industry regularly introduces new safety features and modern technologies, while still keeping the sport an enjoyable experience for fans. The same is true in energy, and the coal industry is leading the way when it comes to innovation. At least 15 next-generation technologies are being used today by America’s coal fleet, and by 2017, the coal industry will have invested $142 billion to reduce emissions.

Like Dale Jr. and Regan, I’m encouraged to know our country is at the forefront of these important clean energy advancements, and that we’re working to ensure America is able to use our most abundant energy resource for generations to come.

Learn more about clean coal technology and check out additional footage from Dale Jr.’s and Regan’s trips to two cutting-edge power plants using clean coal technologies.


Kelley Earnhardt Miller on July 4 and Veterans in the Coal Industry

In our house, the Fourth of July isn’t just a time for food, family, fun and fireworks. It’s a time to reflect on our nation’s freedom and thank the active duty service men and women, as well as our veterans, who have sacrificed to keep our country safe and secure.

We’re proud to count many active members of the military and veterans as fans of NASCAR and JR Motorsports. We love meeting them and thanking them for their service to our nation.

The coal industry has a tremendous legacy of veteran support too, and is a proud leader in veteran employment. From mining in Kentucky and West Virginia, to hauling coal across America’s railways, to building cutting-edge power generation facilities, the coal industry has always welcomed veterans as valuable employees and leaders.

This Fourth of July, the teams at JR Motorsports and America’s Power thank the members of our armed forces both here in the U.S. and stationed abroad. We know that without you we wouldn’t be celebrating this holiday weekend – or any weekend – under the blanket of freedom we all appreciate.

Have a Happy Independence Day, America.


Kelley Earnhardt Miller on Sharing Your Story: What Does Affordable Power Mean to You?

From schools to hospitals to homes, affordable energy is critical to communities from coast to coast. Through our work with America’s Power, the JR Motorsports team has gained a deep appreciation for low-cost, coal-based electricity, and we’ve given a lot of thought to how this issue touches each of our lives. As business owners, Dale Jr. and I are more aware of the importance of affordable energy from coal to keep our costs low and expenses in check. For Regan, whose grandfather sold coal in upstate New York, the subject is even more personal; the coal industry actually provided his family’s livelihood.

Every person has a unique story about how affordable power impacts his or her family and community. This is the basis for America’s Power’s Share Your Story initiative, which encourages supporters to speak about what low-cost electricity means to them. As a mom, I related to Pam M. from Kentucky, who said “Coal means food on the table, a roof over our head and keeping our energy bills lower.”

Hundreds of people from across the country have already shared their story. While the responses are all unique, they reveal a common message: we must protect coal-based electricity and support the people who work hard to keep the lights on in our homes and communities.

So, what does affordable power mean to you? Join Dale Jr., Regan and me, as well as hundreds of other supporters from across the country, and share your story with us.

Visit www.AmericasPower.org/Share-Your-Story to take part today.

 


Guest Blog: Kelley Earnhardt Miller on Family Energy Costs

As a mother of three, I know how challenging it can be to balance our family’s hectic schedule alongside paying the bills. When bills rise unexpectedly, it puts the brakes on a family’s budget.

This is especially true of rising bills that come from necessities like electricity. It’s worrisome when we see electricity rates rising because this expense directly hits parents’ pocketbooks. Money that would be spent on summer camp, college savings and family vacations among other activities has to be diverted just to keep the lights on at home.

We’re glad that North Carolina’s electricity rates are nearly 11 percent lower than the national average, which is largely attributable to our state’s use of coal to generate low-cost, reliable power. Our partner, America’s Power, is committed to ensuring that we all have access to affordable, reliable power no matter where we live as no one should be left in the dark or facing bills they can ill afford to pay.

Until I check back in again in May, I hope you will join me in learning more about coal-based electricity and the role it plays not just in your daily life but in your communities too.

 


Guest Blog: Kelley Earnhardt Miller Celebrates Women in the Energy Industry

On the race track and in the office, my brother Dale Jr. and I work hard to ensure JR Motorsports runs smoothly. The dependable, low-cost electricity powering our business is a big part of that effort.

I was excited to join America’s Power last month as a guest blogger. In my first post, I discussed the importance of reliable electricity and the critical role it plays in my life as a business owner, mom and member of my community. This month, I’m excited to celebrate women in the energy industry who help power our lives—an appropriate topic since March is International Women’s History Month.

Thousands of women are employed in the coal mining, railroad and power utility industries in America, a fact that too often gets overlooked. Careers in the coal industry provide high-paying, stable jobs for skilled workers with tremendous opportunity for advancement and growth. With our society’s efforts to encourage girls to pursue Science, Technology, Engineering and Math careers, more commonly known as “STEM,” energy jobs are a place where they can gain such skills and in turn help shape America’s energy future.

Investments in energy production are funding cutting-edge technologies and programs that will need the next generation of leaders at the helm. With more than 250 years’ worth of coal within our borders, it’s important that these opportunities be extended to many more generations of women in the future.

I’m thankful to women energy workers not only because their work ensures I have the power I need to do my job, but because they are important role models to our girls who want to dream big and build a career in these fields.

Thanks for reading, and see you in April for my next installment on Behind the Plug.

 


Guest Blog: Kelley Earnhardt Miller on the Importance of Reliable Electricity

I’m Kelley Earnhardt Miller, and I co-own JR Motorsports along with my brother Dale Jr. JR Motorsports has partnered with America’s Power for the last three seasons, and we’re looking forward to another great year on and off the track in 2015.

This year, I’m excited to pen a new monthly series for the Behind the Plug blog, where I’ll explore how the important mission of America’s Power—protecting affordable, reliable and increasingly clean electricity from coal—impacts my everyday life as a business owner, mom and member of my community.

Through JR Motorsports’ partnership with America’s Power, I’ve had the opportunity to learn how electricity is generated and the vital role coal plays in the process. Right here in North Carolina, the home of JR Motorsports’ headquarters, coal is responsible for providing nearly 40 percent of our low-cost, reliable electricity.

When temperatures drop as they have across the country this winter, Americans are relieved to know that when they flip a switch, the lights will come on. But behind the electricity that powers homes and businesses are the energy workers who ensure that our power stays on when we need it most. As Dale Jr. says in this month’s featured video, these hard-working men and women “keep the lights on and the cold at bay.”

The 2015 NASCAR season opener is just a few days away, and on behalf of JR Motorsports, I can’t wait to begin another season with America’s Power. Thanks for reading, and check back next month for my new post on Behind the Plug.

 


Advocating for America’s Power: Week 2

Well, energy enthusiasts, another exciting week has passed here at ACCCE. My first week was a whirlwind with the announcement of EPA’s new carbon regulations, but my second week was even more interesting. The initial flurry of activity caused by the announcement has quieted and the delusional claims of the administration are being thoroughly scrutinized. Last week, I approached the EPA regulations on a small scale and addressed how they would affect my home region of Eastern Kentucky. During week two, however, I wanted to look beyond our own borders and see how these regulations could play out on the global stage.

As we all know, if implemented, EPA’s regulations on America’s existing coal fleet will only reduce greenhouse gas emissions by less than one percent. This is a virtual drop in the global climate change bucket. The Obama administration is acutely aware of this negligible reduction yet claims their plan will lead the world by example.  To examine this claim, I wanted to start with a simple question: is President Obama really leading anyone?

For now, let’s just take a look at our nation’s coal-producing allies, Australia and Canada. Recent statements by the Prime Ministers of Australia and Canada clearly show they have no intention of playing “follow the leader.” Tony Abbott of Australia says he refuses to implement a “job-killing carbon tax” that would “clobber” their economy. Stephen Harper of Canada speaks in a similar vein, stating that there was “no chance” a country would implement policies that would “deliberately harm jobs and growth in their country.” With a yearly cost of $8.8 billion, monumental job loss and virtually no benefit, both Australia and Canada understand what an economically foolish undertaking President Obama’s plan is. In contrast to President Obama’s claims of global leadership on climate change, however, our “leader” is standing alone.  I’ll be on the lookout for other nations weighing-in on this debate and let you know what I learn.

 


Advocating for America’s Power: Week 1

If you are a frequent reader of Behind the Plug, you have never seen my name before and may be wondering who I am. Well fellow energy enthusiasts, I am China Riddle, a native Eastern Kentuckian making her way as an intern in Washington, D.C. I am writing to you from my office at the American Coalition of Clean Coal Electricity (ACCCE), where I have worked for one week. My status as an intern who is new to ACCCE may cause you to be skeptical about the credibility of this blog or my knowledge of energy. There is no need to fret, however, as I know first-hand of what I speak.

Before venturing to our nation’s capital, I grew up in a small town in the heart of coal country – Virgie, KY to be exact. My father worked as a miner for seventeen years – making me a true representation of the popular ‘coal miner’s daughter’ notion – and eventually became a chief electrician. When I was fourteen, my father’s unique set of skills in welding and electricity allowed him to open his own mining equipment refurbishing business called K&R Rebuild. While his business is doing well, the volatility of the coal industry has caused serious difficulty in the past few years – difficulties that almost closed us down, putting my family’s livelihood in peril.

Due to the administration’s actions concerning coal-fueled power plants, the despair my family experienced is increasingly being shared by the people of my region. When you shut down coal-fueled power plants, coal mines are also shut down, which in turn affects businesses like my father’s. As I take steps toward my dreams of attending graduate school and working in Washington, D.C., my heart is still tethered to my home. How can I allow myself to leave while my family, friends and neighbors are left to face the hardship EPA’s regulations will surely bring? The answer for me is working at ACCCE and advocating for America’s Power. It is here that I am able to chase my dreams, while still using my skills and passion to work on the most important issue that my native region is facing. Through my role at ACCCE, I can make my voice heard and ardently advocate against unrealistic policies that will leave entire coal producing regions throughout the U.S. in economic turmoil.

So, energy enthusiasts, you can expect to hear more from me over the next eight weeks. I will be updating you on my journey as I work with the staff here at ACCCE to advocate for coal, our most abundant, affordable and reliable source of electricity. Together we can contest these poorly made policies to keep electricity rates down and our lights on.

– China Riddle, Communications Intern